@Jasperpedyo

Lost in the Sauce     The concept of the upcoming show is to present my paintings in a 3 dimensional space blurring the lines between sculpture and mere painting. “Lost in the sauce” is the title I have chosen for the show, to me it encompasses all the ideas that drive my work, which are a pure expression of colour and form as a way to thrust my ideas of beauty and anaesthetic to a larger audience.

Lost in the Sauce

The concept of the upcoming show is to present my paintings in a 3 dimensional space blurring the lines between sculpture and mere painting. “Lost in the sauce” is the title I have chosen for the show, to me it encompasses all the ideas that drive my work, which are a pure expression of colour and form as a way to thrust my ideas of beauty and anaesthetic to a larger audience.

Zimbabwe-born fine artist Jasper Pedyo was chosen by judges for his three large, painted constructions entitled Kisses, Hugs and Jo’Burg. Following his success at Free Range 2018, Jasper opened his first solo show The Expanded Field at 108 Fine Art, Harrogate, which was featured as the Financial Times’ Critics’ Choice. For his new exhibition, Lost in the Sauce, Jasper aims to blur the line between sculpture and painting – altering the shape of the canvas frame and presenting bold and contrasting colours that are free from brushstrokes and recognisable imagery.


“My work sets out to expand on traditional art composition, by abstracting the shape of canvas frame, referencing pop culture. I intend for viewers to experience my artwork with solely instinctive and physical responses to the work's structure, colour, and surrounding space rather than with contextual or interpretive analysis. Thus I present bold and contrasting colours, free of gestural brushstrokes or recognisable imagery

I endeavour to create a visual experience.”

Jasper Pedyo

www.jasperpedyo.co.uk 

@jasperpedyo

@ashprice_

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Ash Price

Ash Price is an inspired tattoo flash artist based in Essex. Influenced by graphic design and pop culture, Ash merged the two with his interests in tattoos and his style began to progress. His upbringing as a teen consisted of getting tattooed and painting tattoo flash; since then, Ash has constantly been continuing to learn and develop his own skills and style. 

What inspires you as an artist

Mostly getting better and continuing to learn, I love learning. There are also some great artists that I follow which I feel resonate with me more than most, right now a couple of my favourite artists Han Shinko and Nacho Eterno are naturally very big influences and inspirations to me.


What differentiates your style?

That’s hard to say, there are a lot of tattoo flash influenced designers, I think what I pride myself on is the attention to detail, line weight, colour palettes and achieving an overall consistent outcome. 

Any other interests?

I make music. I’d also like to learn to code/ develop apps and software, but my brain struggles with that! I believe with enough passion and hard work, any talent can be learnt, just some minds have a better way of processing certain skills.


What role does an artist play in this kind of society do you think?

Any job is always a means to survive and live a good life, I think for me personally, the idea of earning a wage and providing a means for other people, brands etc to earn a wage too, is the role that I play. I like to think that my designs with the bold lines and bright colours bring some kind of comfort and happiness to anyone seeing them.


How did you manage to get your name out there 

Essentially purely through Instagram, I started posting to my page around 2 years ago, and really started consistently working and posting just over a year ago, so gradually I’ve been interacting, doing work and slowly growing the following and business since then.


What advice would you give to other aspiring artists

Keep working, be consistent and keep creating. Sometimes the work you’re least happy with give the best lessons and help you grow as an artist. Most importantly stay true to yourself and have fun.

@Ashprice_

www.coldstance.com

@Pollyevanss

No Man Is an Island   This project comes from Polly’s frustration with the current political, economic and social landscape of our country. It has been influenced by events, such as Brexit, and decisions made by our government which she feels will negatively impact the younger generation as they grow up. The work looks at the identity of Britain and its inhabitants and reflects the confusion of a nation in political disarray. Like the poem, No Man Is an Island by John Donne, it explores ideas of division and separation and asks the question; What is the future for a nation so divided?

No Man Is an Island

This project comes from Polly’s frustration with the current political, economic and social landscape of our country. It has been influenced by events, such as Brexit, and decisions made by our government which she feels will negatively impact the younger generation as they grow up. The work looks at the identity of Britain and its inhabitants and reflects the confusion of a nation in political disarray. Like the poem, No Man Is an Island by John Donne, it explores ideas of division and separation and asks the question; What is the future for a nation so divided?

Polly Evans is a London based artist and recent graduate from Nottingham Trent University, having studied BA(Hons) Photography. She makes installations that use video, sound and spoken word to invite viewers to engage in the issues she presents. Her work confronts political and social problems in modern day Britain and concentrates on how these adversely affect minority groups in our society. Polly’s art practice centers around making engagement with these issues accessible to everyone. Her work is also influenced by her current studies in MA Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths University.  

@pollyevanss

@ryanroadkill

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Ryan Quickfall

Ryan is a full time artist/illustrator living in Newcastle Upon Time, with his wife, two cats and a badly behaved dog. Fuelled by punk rock and black coffee, Ryan explores the fragility of subcultures in a fast-paced modern world and the gradual erosion of rebellion in a climate of constant surveillance.

What differentiates your style from other artists?

It’s hard to say technically what sets me apart from others. But I think the biggest asset to set yourself apart from others is your brain. Others work may look like yours and you may even find yourself replicating styles as you explore your own techniques, but you can use your brain to have your own ideas to apply these techniques. I know I have some mad ideas that most likely nobody else would have thought.

How did you reach the following that you have now?

I’ve spent a long time building a genuine and authentic following of my work. With social media it’s so easy to get carried away with how many followers you have. What is far more important to me, is having a following who interact with you. Who buy work from you. To do that takes time and you need to give as much time to your followers as possible. It can be incredibly hard though when you have constant work to do.  

What role does an artist play in this kind of society do you think?

I think a lot of artists, especially the more established ones try to challenge opinions or stir up some thought from the viewer. Personally, I don’t have any kind of strong political message that is a constant theme in my work, but I do try and show my inspiration and drive in my work. I am concerned about the lack of integrity in movements today and the fragility of subcultures. The fast-paced modern society doesn’t let a good thing last too long before everyone’s jumping on it! 

Have you ever reached a time when you wanted to give up art? 

Not really give it up, but working every day on it, coming to the studio 8.30 - 9 am and then going home and a lot of night working till 9pm because there is a ton of work to get through gets hard. It’s my own fault most of the time, but in those circumstances sometimes I just want a break from it. There’s a constant sense of wanting to take work on just incase it dries up one day. I don’t think it will, but there’s a bit at the back of your head always thinks that, and that’s what keeps you jumping! 

Where do you see yourself in 5 years time? 

I would like to be doing more self initiated works and balance better the client workload.  More large scale works and some gallery shows. Collaborate with more brands. That is my target. 


What's the best piece of advice you have ever been given?

I’m not sure I’ve officially been given this but striving to be where I am now made me learn a few things. If someone hammered this into me years ago I would have appreciated it.

1. Hard work pays off. Work hard and as much as you can while you’re able to get work and to develop your style.

2. Develop your own style and be consistent with it, it’s all you have.

3. Work wiser not harder. Once you’ve got a style that people want and are recognising, don’t burn out. To progress you have to work smarter. Sometimes less is more! 

@ryanroadkill

shop.ryanroadkill.com

@devils_point

A Bird Flies Backwards     The friends that you have, seem like the only people you’ll ever need. The places you’ve visited are new and wonderful. Wild loves that force you to crumble to the floor and quietly weep. Noticing the vulnerability in people, who your whole life have been an oak. The absent ones who adored you. The absent ones whom you adored. Faces you might never see again. Understanding the necessity of change.

A Bird Flies Backwards

The friends that you have, seem like the only people you’ll ever need. The places you’ve visited are new and wonderful. Wild loves that force you to crumble to the floor and quietly weep. Noticing the vulnerability in people, who your whole life have been an oak. The absent ones who adored you. The absent ones whom you adored. Faces you might never see again. Understanding the necessity of change.

Cole Flynn Quirke is a photographer from Brighton whose photographic process is primarily autobiographical. Cole experiments with moving image, sound and collage in his work, and prints all photographs by hand. Cole’s work was recently featured in the show Many & Beautiful Things at Newlyn Art Gallery & The Exchange in Penzance. He creates personal time capsules through documenting everything he holds dear, printing all photographs by hand. In Cole’s practice he experiments with moving image, sound, and collage. The work is considered as personal documentary.

For his new exhibition, A Bird Flies Backwards, Cole has chosen to explore and document his own views on existence – looking at life, death and understanding change following his grandmother’s death. Cole’s recent project ‘Prodigal Whopperhead’ captured 365 days of his life during a transitional period, in attempt to memorialise everything he cares about for fear of developing his grandfather’s early onset hereditary dementia. 

The photographer has recently featured work as part of the show ‘Many & Beautiful Things’ at Newlyn Art Gallery & The Exchange in Penzance, alongside renowned photographers such as Joseph Szabo and Rineke Dijkstra.

www.coleflynnquirke.com 

@abirdfliesbackwards

@devils_point

Pistonhead Foundation Launched!

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Pistonhead Lager today announces the launch of The Pistonhead Foundation – a brand new initiative dedicated to supporting musicians, artists, and independent venues across the UK.

Acting as a support network for creatives and venues, the Pistonhead Foundation aims to alleviate everyday costs, as well as providing free rehearsal and creative spaces to those who need it.

From providing the deposit for a tour bus or replacing stolen instruments for a band; to leasing exhibition space or being the drinks sponsor at an artists’ first show, Pistonhead are looking to provide a healthy support to creatives at a time when pay is stagnating and venues are struggling across the UK.

Teaming up with Pirate Studios – a network of rehearsal studios in London - and So Young Magazine’s illustrator competition, the Foundation will also be drawing on a network of partners to provide creative space and opportunities.

The arrival of the Pistonhead Foundation follows a rich history of supporting music and subcultures, which has seen the drinks brand sponsor gigs, festivals, exhibitions and car shows across the UK.